Today Mtoto and I had a brilliant play at Geneva’s best sandpit. And no, we weren’t in Park de la Grange, Parc Bertrand or any of the other fine parks that offers sand play. We were at Baby Plage.

Two plastic cups and a ball from Migros consist of our portable play equipment

Two plastic cups and a ball from Migros consist of our portable play equipment

Baby Plage is so called because it is a beach reserved for babies and children and their families and it has been so since 2007. It is a free beach and the amenities, or lack of them, reflect this. But, in theory at least, it is a place where families can go to hang out and enjoy being lakeside for a while. There are places that do the whole beaches experience better, like Geneve Plage and Bains de Paquis. At Geneve Plage you get changing rooms, water slides and eateries, life guards and a secure compound for your money. At Bains de Paquis you only pay two Francs at the height of summer (or you can buy a membership) and at this community-run venue you get a simple beach (stony rather than sandy), good-value food, changing rooms and life guards. At Baby Plage you get a sandy beach and some play equipment in the trees. That’s really it, there aren’t even accessible toilets (the only ones are just outside the grounds and are underground, accessible only by steep steps).

Play equipment (right), sandcastles and the Mountain Buggy with Lake Geneva behind.

Play equipment (right), sandcastles and the Mountain Buggy with Lake Geneva behind.

Despite its limited attractions Baby Plage is still where it is at for us, a Dad and a toddler. Take today, for example. It was pouring with rain. So much so, that I was willing to go home if Mtoto didn’t want to get out of the buggy. But get out he did and he got on with playing with some gusto. We started with the sand cups (two cheap Migros-bought plastic cups that are easily packed into any day out). I built the sandcastles and Mtoto kicked them over. But he also got into building them, which is something that he has only recently shown interest in doing. Then we got the ball out and we kicked it around the beach. The only rules are that he’s not allowed to go past the fences (including one near the water) and he’s not allowed to kick the ball in the water. Then Mtoto got into kicking the ball into the sandcastles.

Eventually, tiring of the ball and the sandcastles, Mtoto got back into travel play. A train, a bus, a crane and a ticket office later, we had a lovely game going, where Mtoto would buy tickets from me and then go on journeys. There were less materials to choose tickets from than at the park, so Mtoto had to make do with leaves or sticks until I found a bit of bark with lichen on it. Mtoto liked it so much that at the end of the game he put the lichen bark in the buggy to take home.

The Baby Plage trees at Lake Geneva that house the swinging play equipment.

The Baby Plage trees at Lake Geneva that house the swinging play equipment.

The play equipment in the trees that I referred to earlier are an interesting project, which I hope Mtoto will enjoy when he’s older. They’re made from recycled materials such as old bicycle tires and were first set up by a local resident, Jean Georges Ernst, and are now being managed by a local association that looks after the condition of the beach. Their website makes for some slightly hilarious (if you don’t use the equipment) reading. As well as stating that the equipment doesn’t reach European standards for outdoor play equipment, they state that on questions concerning the safety of the equipment:

“If your question concerns the reliability of materials and method of assembly we can not give you an absolute guarantee, but we can reassure you by saying no accidents due to the technique has happened to Baby Beach so far. By cons, if you mean the risk to users, in theory, they are innumerable.”

What they’re basically saying is that no one that they know of has had an accident so far, but they rely on people to use their common sense. And the best people who make use of their common sense are children, they say.

A Mute Swan (left) with two Red-crested Pochards

A Mute Swan (left) with two Red-crested Pochards

Mtoto didn’t want to leave but I was getting cold. I didn’t have the advantage of the all-in-one winter suit that he has. As we reached the exit, Mtoto spotted some puddles and launched right in. I’ve learned quickly enough that as long as Mtoto isn’t falling over or worse, he can do what he likes in the puddles. So he splashed and he ran and he got me involved, demanding a stand over the puddles with legs apart so he could go under my bridge, as he puts it. Such joy!

By the time we left, the rain had eased off, but it was time for lunch anyway, so off we went.

2015 birds

At Baby Plage we saw the usual Mute Swans, Tufted Ducks, Coots, Mallard Ducks (including two males in a vicious fight where they appeared to be trying to drown each other), House Sparrows, Red-crested Pochards, Walking along the lakeside, we also saw two moorhens, who are much less common on the lake at the moment.

Two male Mallards fighting off Baby Plage in Lake Geneva.

Two male Mallards fighting off Baby Plage in Lake Geneva.

Janathon

A quick walk to get Mtoto off to sleep in the rain this afternoon, 1km in around 12 minutes. I did my core stretches in Mtoto’s bedroom today. While doing a 1-minute plank Mtoto decided to climb on me. It was funny, but meant that I was carrying his weight as well as my own. Eventually I collapsed on the floor laughing, with Mtoto laughing too and asking his catchphrase question “what happened?”

All-in-one-suit and snow boots = fun in puddles

All-in-one-suit and snow boots = fun in puddles